TV – Goal, Side Hustle, or Oh-Dear-Heaven?

TV - Goal, Side Hustle, or Oh-Dear-Heaven?If you write topical, trending, pop culture books, there’s one benefit (or liability) I forgot to mention: TV shows.

If you’ve written a fresh, innovative book or two (and marketed them with a supporting blog or quirky author platform), and the topic is trending (or a cyclical interest), you may hear from TV producers.

Of course, maybe that was your goal all along. If so: yaaayyy!

Or, maybe working with TV shows could be a side hustle (a part-time income source). It may also boost your book sales. Again: yaaayyyy for more income!

Or – at the other extreme – you may mutter “Oh dear heaven” every time another TV producer contacts you, especially if you’ve had a bad experience in the past.

“Producer” Can Mean Many Things

The first thing to know is: a “producer” may have an actual job with an actual production company.

Or, he/she may be someone who’s worked in the entertainment industry and is putting together a show idea to pitch to a network.

Even when they say “I’m working with [major network],” they may actually mean, “A network seems open to ideas – or I’ve had good conversations with them in the past.”

I’m okay with that. As the cliche goes: That’s entertainment.

Why Producers Contact You

Producers will contact you for one of two reasons.

1) They’re casting a show and they’re looking for “talent” (people who will be on-screen, talking and doing things), or they’re looking for guests to appear on the show, or they want your input (ideas or research).

Terminology

  • “Talent” usually gets paid. If you’re going that route, be sure to get a good entertainment manager and a related contract attorney. Do not be like the ensemble of newbies who agreed to share $500/week… without realizing that a typical reality/unscripted TV show requires ~3 days (not including travel time) to film, per episode.
  • “Guest experts” often appear on-screen for a few minutes per episode, or in lots of little segments throughout one episode. Some get paid. Most don’t. (Be sure to negotiate for your name and book title on-screen, when your segment/s are in the show.)
  • Off-screen… you may simply “talk shop.” That’s fun and I’m rarely paid for a few hours (spaced over several days, weeks, or months) of chatting about a topic I’ve written about.
  • Or, a show may hire you as a consultant/researcher. That can mean anything from scouting filming locations, to locating fellow experts to appear as guests, to providing additional research info as content for a particular episode.

If you do this, learn from my mistakes: Get 50% payment, up-front. According to friends who work as consultants/researchers, regularly, that’s normal.

And, even if you have a contract, make sure you have an entertainment/contract attorney ready to enforce it.

I’ll sheepishly admit that I spent three weeks scouting historical locations for a paranormal show… and was never paid. They said the producer wasn’t actually authorized to sign contracts. Ouch. Lesson learned!

OR…

2) They’re working on some ideas and need expert input for background info, to fact-check a few key points, or because they hope you’ll present them with a fully marketable show concept they can use, as-is.

I don’t mind calls like that, when I’m not busy. I know I’m unlikely to be paid for it, so – for me, anyway – it’s just a chat with someone who’s fun and enthusiastic about a topic.

Because I value my privacy, I do not tell him/her my real name. Ever. (Not unless a contract and payment are involved, and – even then – the production company’s contract writer and accountants are the only ones who need to know my real name.)

Do You Wanna Be in Pictures…? Really?

If you sign up to be a regular member of the show’s team/cast – meaning: in front of the camera – consider what you’re giving up.

First of all, your privacy can vanish. I know people who’ve appeared in shows that trended briefly, and then were cancelled. One is a close friend. He can’t even go to the grocery store without being recognized and asked for an autograph.

Yes, people sometimes recognize me, too, from my public appearances. Most are respectful enough to ask, “Are you [pen name]?” (I may or may not admit to it.) Then they drift off once I’ve answered their (brief) question. Generally, I decline to autograph anything except my books.

My point is: You and every member of your immediate family will be in the limelight. And, if the media glom onto you, the exposure can be relentless. (Seriously, Jennifer Anniston doesn’t need to make another movie or TV series, ever. She’ll probably be on the covers of tabloids for the rest of her life, whether she likes it or not.)

Think about your life, but also the privacy of your parents. Your kids. And remember that distant cousin who’s always wanted to be famous, and he/she might write a tell-all book or give embarrassing interviews to tabloids. (Really. It happens. Like what Meghan Markle has had to deal with.)

Related to that: after the show is cancelled, you may not be able to return to your old career.

  • That’s partly about privacy. Some companies don’t want the attention a “TV star” might bring them, no matter how brief your entertainment career.
  • It’s also about how the show portrayed you. (Heaven help you if you were edited to look not-very-bright, weird, promiscuous, or two-faced. That’s how the HR person may think of you, seeing your name on a resume.)
  • It’s also a (possibly legitimate) concern that, if a company hired you, you might vanish in a few months when the next network hires you for a new TV series.

So, if you usually need a “day job” to cover your bills, keep the financial aspects in mind. Like a book that’s viral for a short time… TV paycheques can come to an abrupt halt.

One smart friend negotiated his filming schedule so he kept his day job. He’d show up on the TV set on weekends, and film his segments with the rest of the “reality show” cast.

When the show was cancelled, he still had his day job. Life went back to normal. (Or normal-ish, anyway.)

After the Gig is Over (or the show is cancelled)

Many former TV stars (and full-time researchers/consultants) have two likely options to continue the fame and/or fortune.

You can travel either path, or or pursue both at the same time.

  1. Hit the road and talk at events, colleges, TV talk shows (national or local), radio shows, podcasts, etc., and hope you’re entertaining/interesting enough to remain popular (and well paid).
  2. Build on your existing fame (this should start while you’re still on TV) with what you and I usually consider an author platform: Books and merchandising, a website or two, a YouTube channel, lots of social media, and so on.

For merchandising, shop around. Search for “on-demand merchandising” and look for companies – like Teespring and Merch by Amazon – that don’t require an up-front membership fee or investment.

(I haven’t had time to look at Printful, but they’re one of many companies that offer a broad range of merchandise you can brand. That’s convenient, but you may do better by going directly to individual print-on-demand companies. Research carefully before committing to just one option.)

And, of course, if you’re reading this, you already know that being an indie author is both easy and free… and $2 (for a $2.99 Kindle book) is a far better per-copy-sold royalty than the 35-cents (per printed book sold) that traditional publishers offer. (And then there’s the income from digital books “borrowed” via Kindle Unlimited. And audio books, and so on.)

Amazon offers all the tools you need to publish your own book today, and see income from it tomorrow.

Reminders:

  • For great, inexpensive book covers, I like Fiverr’s vikncharlie.
  • For editing, ask at kboards.com. A search for “editors” can point you to people doing good work, inexpensively. Be sure the editors’ reviews are current and credible.
  • For book promotions on a shoestring, Fiverr’s bknights still gets raves from many authors.
Why I Wrote This

So… yes. This week, I’ve heard from three TV producers and actually spoke with one on the phone. Usually, I hear from a producer about once every two or three months. (It’s been that way since around 2003, when one of my books – related to a pop culture trend – attracted attention.)

Generally, I’m not interested in TV. I’ve seen too many friends get sucked into that scene, and emerge damaged by the experience.

Also, I like my privacy. There is no way I’ll be in front of the camera.

I’ll be a consultant or researcher, but only on my own terms. It has to be fun and it has to pay pretty well.

Otherwise, if a producer wants to “talk shop” about my niche, and my schedule isn’t too crazy, I’ll happily chat for an hour or so. No strings attached.

Just be aware that TV producers may contact you if you write trending, topical nonfiction topics (and some abruptly successful fiction sub-genres). Remain on your toes. Know if you’ll be paid: how much and when, for exactly what kind of work.

Don’t get sucked into the “this could be fame and fortune” vortex. Not with your eyes closed, anyway.

Mostly, keep writing. It’s what we do… right?

TED-ish Talk Tips – and a question

Lately, I’ve been creating YouTube videos to promote my nonfiction books. Often, I share one or two tips from a book, and then point viewers to it at Amazon.

TED-ish Talk Tips for Video Book TrailersThat presents some slight problems.

First of all, there is no way I’m stepping in front of a camera. That’s a privacy issue.

So, my presentation has to be compelling.

The second issue is a quirky one. I’m kind of famous in one niche, and people know my voice from lots of radio shows, public appearances, podcasts, and so on.

(I was on the History Channel once, as well. It was less fun than I’d hoped.)

But this means I can’t sound like myself in videos under another pen name. Someone is sure to notice the voice and say, “Hey, wait… I know that voice! She’s [pen name]!”

So, my presentation has to say everything in text, usually in slides, right there on the screen.

(I use music for the backgrounds. If you’re doing this, I recommend getting the 7-day free trial membership at AudioBlocks.com. You can download 20 audios per day. It’ll save you money while you’re deciding whether you want to continue making videos.)

Anyway…

To keep my slides interesting, I’m studying TED Talks.

As a shortcut to understanding what works – and doesn’t – in related slide presentations, I like a book called How To Design Ted Worthy Presentation Slides, by Akash Karia.

If you don’t mind reading an older version of that book – it’s shorter by about 35 pages – you can find a PDF of it here: http://communicationskillstips.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/How-to-Design-TED-Wothy-Presentation-Slides.pdf

He links to some great resources.

Meanwhile…

Like many people, I’m stepping away from Facebook. Not entirely, because – for now – it’s still useful for connecting with fellow writers. And for advertising, maybe.

(Seeing how wrong Facebook got my interests, I’m not as enthusiastic about their “targeted” ads, now.)

I might just use HootSuite to post quick links at my Facebook page. It is a convenient way for people to see them.

Or, I’m considering doing that at a blog (maybe here), and people will see those posts if they’ve subscribed to my emails (in the right column on this page), or if they use an RSS reader. (Yeah. I know. That’s very old-school, but it’s something I may go back to, myself.)

So, I’m interested in your reactions. How would you feel about a mix of quick, short links-plus-blurbs here, in addition to my usual everything-but-the-kitchen-sink posts?

Or, should I set up a “just the links, ma’am” kind of blog, for those posts?

UPDATE: The response was almost immediate. Many of my readers made it clear that they prefer infrequent, personal, sometimes-long articles. So, I’ll be setting up a separate micro-posts blog for links, trivia, and the occasional/fleeting bright idea.

Font Choices – Prettier Printed Books

Free font choices for prettier printed books.When I publish a topical book that needs to be selling in Amazon immediately (if not sooner), the formatting is usually plain vanilla.

For CreateSpace books, my go-to font is 11- or 12-point Georgia. I center the headings (or use the default in OpenOffice), and I make sure the margins seem wide enough.

(That can be a tricky balance. I don’t want it took look as if I used big type and wide margins to the book looks longer than it is. But, with too-narrow interior, readers might have to pry open the book to see all the words.)

For my latest book, I did something different. I actually spent an hour at Google Fonts, selecting a font I liked. I chose “Unna.”

But, I also snagged several other fonts from this guy’s list, for future use. Some are better than others. The main ones I looked at: Prata, Oranienbaum, Rozha One, Rufina, Suranna, and Unna.

Most of these are different from the free commercial fonts I download at FontSquirrel.com.

Your impressions may vary, so I recommend checking his full list:

https://www.quora.com/What-are-some-typefaces-that-are-similar-to-Didot

And then… I discovered I actually liked tweaking the printed book so the appearance was pleasing. (This one is likely to sell in tourist gift shops, so I wanted to be sure the book had the publishing equivalent of “curb appeal.”)

I may go back and reformat several of my printed books.

(Tip: “Fringe” readers – aka those who like woo-woo topics – and academics tend to buy printed books. So do some readers of Regencies and other historical romances. And the occasional cozy mystery reader, who wants to flip back through the pages, seeing the clues/foreshadowing that had been hiding in plain sight.)

“Down the Rabbit Hole” Topics for Viral Books

How to find "rabbit hole" topics for fast, viral booksOkay, since Rob Howard’s appalling “easy, viral books” report came out, I’m reluctant to go anywhere near that phrase.

But… that phrase does describe a very broad niche in which I’ve been successful.

I’m talking about easy, viral books. The ones I describe in my own book about writing… well, viral books.

(That’s different from what Rob talks about. We just happen to use similar phrases, talking about books that can be written quickly, and sell well.)

Anyway…

I should be writing (as Mur Lafferty says), but I woke up realizing I should also share a couple of resources with you.

They’re strictly for topical, viral books. The kinds of books I write in a few days. Maybe a couple of weeks, max.

It all starts with an “ooh, shiny!” topic. Maybe it’s in the news. Maybe it’s evergreen. Maybe it’s both.

I research it, and share the juiciest, most interesting things I’ve learned. (Kind of like this article, I guess.)

Some of those books sell in the four-figures region for a couple of months, and then go flat. A few keep selling. And selling. And selling.

Of course, it helps if I re-energize them regularly, following the recommendations in Chris Fox’s superb book, Relaunch Your Novel. (Except, of course, my books are rarely novels. His principles apply to nonfiction, too.)

Anyway…

I find my book topics in the news. Usually, I’m browsing their “weird news” section, or – less often – skimming their strange opinion/editorial topics.

(The latter are the ones I blink at and wonder, “Who thought that was important – or even credible – right now?” But, clearly, someone did, and so did an editor with her – or his – finger on the pulse of a broad group of readers.)

Example: The Washington Post’s “wild card” option, in their digital editions. (I read it daily on my Kindle Fire. $1 for six months of daily news…? Lots of quirky, viral book ideas…? Ooh, yes!)

This morning, it was an article about taste buds and weight gain.  A book on that topic – and suggestions for dealing with it – could do very well. My goodness, it could even spawn a cookbook series featuring healthy, extra tasty foods.

That’s one of maybe half a dozen great, viral-ish topics I saw in the Washington Post in the past 24 hours.

The other resource is where I get more evergreen ideas: An American magazine that’s near every grocery store cash register. It’s called “First for Women.”

Every one of their magazine covers could provide at least two or three really good book ideas. Usually, more.

I have their December 4th (2017) issue next to me. Here are a few headlines and subtitles/blurbs. Any of them could be great, viral books. And each would be unique, because it would be based on your topical research and your angle on the subject.

  • “Reclaim your brain… bye-bye tired! / The heavy metal making women feel slow and tired & the natural compound that sweeps it away. Feel the fog lift in 24 hours!”
  • “Instant Confidence! / Double chin – Saggy butt – Belly rolls – Thigh jiggles…”
  • “Body Clock Cures / Insomnia – Anxiety – Slow metabolism – Winter sadness – Headaches – Cravings”

And that’s not even the main headline on the cover. (It’s about a thyroid detox. That’s a topic they feature at least once every few months.)

As I’m looking at this cover, and thinking about the endless winter this year – the storms that keep bringing snow and gloomy skies in the American northeast and across much of the UK – I’m thinking about “winter sadness” and SAD. A well-marketed book about that could do very well, this year.

So anyway, that was on my mind this morning. I hope this information is helpful. Now, I need to get my current book finished and in Kindle.

If you write one of these books in the near future, feel free to link to it in a comment at this article. I’d love to see your ideas for books like these!

Relay That! – Reviewed for Authors

Relay That - reviewed for authors“Relay That!” may be exactly what you need, if you’re managing your own social media marketing… and it’s taking far too much time.

I bought a lifetime membership (it’s software you’ll use online, in the cloud) for $49 through a special AppSumo.com deal. When I saw what the software did, I didn’t even hesitate.

(If that link doesn’t work, it’s because it’s AppSumo’s “share at Facebook” link. And, when the deal is over – or perhaps sooner – that link may not work.)

Since I started using it, I’m even more glad that I bought Relay That!

Basically, it streamlines the process of creating original, unique social media graphics. (You can also use it for PowerPoint slides, and for Kindle book covers… sort of. I’ll get to that in a minute.)

The Importance of Pinterest

Recently, I tested Pinterest for marketing, and I was kind of amazed at the surge in traffic to my sites, and a related increase in my book income.

So, I put a free WordPress plugin on all of my sites, and I bought a license to place Tasty Pins on my biggest, book-related website.

  • The free plugin is Pinterest Pin It Button On Image Hover and After Post & Page Content.  Yes, that’s it’s full name. Yes, it hasn’t been updated in some time, so WP says it may not be compatible with current WP installs. It’s also the best of the free Pinterest plugins I’ve tried. (I’m using it on this site.)
  • The Tasty Pins plugin… well, yes, it’s designed for people with recipe blogs. The plugin happens to be the only one I’ve seen that actually does what it says.

(When you’re adding WP images, the Tasty Pins plugin gives you an extra section where you can put the exact text you’d like displayed when someone Pins your post/image. The non-plugin alternative is to put the text in the “Alt” section for the graphic… and hope for the best.)

NOTE: That Tasty Pins plugin is sold with a single-site license. Unless your site and books are earning money to justify this expense, the price – I think it was $29 – may not seem worth it.

Anyway…

I was designing my own Pinterest graphics – generally 600 x 900 pixels.  In WordPress, people see reduced versions inside each article. (When someone Pins the image/article, the graphic will display full-size at Pinterest.)

But, those graphics were taking me an hour (or more) to create and tweak… and tweak… and tweak. (Have I mentioned how finicky I can be? Or how much perfectionism gets in my way?)

So anyway, I took a quick glance at “Relay That!” and knew it might save me time. And, since AppSumo.com deals can vanish in a blink, I bought the software right away.

My Review of Relay That!

A review of the WP plugin, Relay That!This product is a gold mine, on many levels, and not just because it can save a lot of time. Like a slightly confusing mine tunnel, the deeper you go into Relay That’s options, the more useful tools and designs you’ll discover.

It’s not perfect. There are some features I’d like to see added, soon.

One of them is the ability to choose font sizes. At the moment, the software works best in “dummies mode,” so you can choose different fonts & font colors… but the size (in points) remains the same.

Another is the option of moving some of the design elements, even a little. Right now, the layout you see is what you get.

But, even with those kinds of issues, I’m happy with this software. I spent about 15 minutes (maybe a little less) creating the graphics for this article.  Past, similar efforts – before Relay That – took me at least an hour, and didn’t look as polished.

Yesterday, I turned out seven Pinterest graphics and posted them with (existing) articles. Then I designed a book cover in Relay That, too. All in less than two hours.

You can use Relay That right out of the box.

  • You can use their graphics (over 250k of them) or upload your own.
  • Choose the finished image size (generally designed for specific social media sites, from Twitter to YouTube to LinkedIn to… well, you get the idea).
  • Change the text to fit your needs.
  • Then, download the finished graphic.

That’s it. It could take you five minutes, and the finished product could look pretty darned amazing.

Or, you could let perfectionism slip in, as I do.

My process involves using my own photos, or finding one online. (Lately, I rely on sites like Pexels and Pixabay, and my annual membership to Storyblocks.com‘s images.)

But… a lot of those sites provide photos larger than 10MB, and 10MB is the current per-image upload limit at Relay That.

So, I add a step: I reduce the image in Photoshop, with a simple “save for web…” at medium or high levels. (You could do the same thing with Gimp or any free graphics program.)

Then, I’m ready to create an “ooh, shiny!” social media graphic at Relay That. 

The learning curve is pretty mild. I recommend going through the Relay That tutorial (it’s 11 easy steps) and actually doing what they’re demonstrating, as you follow along.

Tips:

  • I think the Font 1, Font 2, and Highlight tabs need more explaining. I recommend experimenting with them to see what they do.
  • Also, using brackets – { and } – around ANY section of the text, even an entire section (like your URL), makes it a “highlight.”

So then I create my graphic. That takes minutes. 10 – 15, at the very most. (The one at the top of this page took under a minute in Relay That!)

After that, if I’m going to post at several social media sites, switching graphic sizes and design styles is really easy. Click, click… and done!

All with the same basic image/s & text. (It’s ridiculously simple. It’s what I did for the graphics on this page.)

Then, after downloading the finished social media graphics (I download as JPGs), I go back to Photoshop and tweak. (Because: finicky.)

What do I tweak…? Well, for Pinterest, I start with Relay That’s 800 x 1200 Tall Post template, and reduce it to 600 x 900 (so it’s a smaller file size), and then “save for web” to reduce the file size even more.

For Facebook posts (like the one at the top of this page), I just “save for web” at full size.

I love how easy this is. And how fast.

Relay That also offers templates for book covers (1410 x 2250 pixels). However, they’re pretty ho-hum (Relay That says they’re expanding their design options) and frustrating since I can’t tweak the font sizes.

So, don’t buy this with immediate plans to design all your book covers in Relay That.

However, for simple books – the kind that take a day or two to write – those covers may be good enough. Later today, I’ll be publishing a book with a cover I designed in Relay That. All it needed was a really simple cover.

Also, Relay That has templates for things like Facebook Covers, which – at 1920 x 1080 pixels – are ideal for slides in my YouTube videos. Wheeeeee!

Then there are some quirky bells & whistles like can’t-miss-this watermarks, for anyone selling their photos or artwork.

… And probably a bunch of other features I haven’t discovered in the two days since I bought Relay That. (I’m also writing a book right now.)

So, that’s my review. I wanted to throw this together right away, while AppSumo is offering such a great price for Relay That.

(As I’m writing this, AppSumo’s deal is $49 for a lifetime membership. If you buy a membership at the RelayThat.com site, it’s $25 – $97/month, depending on the level of membership you want.)

Personally, I’m delighted with RelayThat. It’s already saved me a full day’s time (working on Pinterest graphics)… which leaves me more time for writing. And it opens opportunities to expand my marketing into other social media.

Links for Indie Authors – A Few Goodies from Feb 2018

IndieAuthorToolsLinks-Mar2018Want to start March with more focus and energy? Shaking off the winter doldrums?

Here are my latest favorite resources & tips.

And – just so you know – I’m so busy with other projects, I don’t follow many blogs or YouTube channels.

(Oh, I receive the email notification… I just don’t click very often. Unroll.me keeps my emails under control, and I can go for days – sometimes more than a week – without opening any of those collections.)

So, what I’m recommending here are the few articles, etc., that I consider worth your time, even if you’re super-busy.

Book Promotion: Do This, Not That – the Book Designer blog is usually useful. This article finally explained to me why some authors use Ingram Spark instead of (or in addition to) CreateSpace. In a way, it’s a clunky solution and has some clear drawbacks. But, as a solution to a specific problem – pre-sales of printed books – it may interest you.

Next topic… Pinterest.

For far too long, I’ve thought of Pinterest as just another time-sucking social media site. I haven’t used it.

Then, I did.

Oops.

Yes, it does generate traffic and interest. If your audience is a match for Pinterest – 80% women, generally from the USA – consider making Pinterest part of your marketing strategy.

Note: I did not say “get on Pinterest and start pinning.” That may be a smart choice for you. Me…? At the moment, I’m too busy to add that to my to-do list.

Instead, I’m making sure all of my book-related blog posts are Pinterest friendly.

This means I’m including a 600 x 900 graphic – with text – that someone may decide to pin. And that can lead to more traffic.

(Like I said: So far, to my absolute amazement, it’s working. And not just in niches related to cooking, weddings, and party planning. In fact, Pinterest is driving traffic to my completely unlikely niches.)

Do you need a 600 (wide) x 900 (tall) template to work with? Click here for a GIF you can use. If you’re using Photoshop or other software that can read PSDs, click here for a layered template that may be useful. (Note: the fonts are Thirsty Rough, Museo, and Museo Slab… in case you’re interested.)

Here are my recommendations:

  1. Be sure your website is Pinterest friendly. For me, that means using a free WordPress plugin so it’s easy for visitors to pin my shiny new 600 x 900 graphics. I’m using Pinterest Pin It Button on Hover…
  2. Depending on your blog’s aesthetics, you may want to change how that 600 x 900 graphic appears on your website. (It’ll still show up, full sized, at Pinterest and in emails sent via Feedburner.) Here are some ideas (some are better than others, and – like everything else online – the rules can change in a blink): How to Create Super Stealthy Pinterest Images for Your Blog. Cruise her other articles and notice what she’s doing to help people share her posts, too.
  3. If you’re a graphics geek like me, invest in templates to make designing easier. Frankly, I’m using the 50 Instagram Stories Bundle, from Design Cuts. I bought it on a great sale, but even at $20 (price as I’m writing this), it can be such a time-saver, it’s worth it.
  4. Learn to combine fonts in interesting & attractive ways. I’m using cheatsheets I printed, online. You can search images for “font combinations,” “font combining,” or “font mixing” and see what looks good. Or, you can go to a Pinterest board like Font combining… and click through on anything that appeals to you.  Among the 10 or so I printed, one from Imgur has been the most useful. (Also, I still rely on free font sites like FontSquirrel.com and Google Fonts.)

Speaking of fonts, my friend Milan told me about a great site for font addicts, and people willing to try beta-ish versions of new fonts: Future Fonts.

Other resources that have been helpful (in above-and-beyond ways) this month:

I’m sure I’ve forgotten a few resources, but this should be enough to keep you busy for an hour or two. And, really, I carefully chose these links. My goal was to provide time-savers, not shiny object distractions. (In other words: don’t get sucked into Pinterest… okay?)

And now it’s time to get back to the books!

Fixing Failed Fiction

True confession: Yes, I still have far too much failed fiction – novels, novellas, short stories, and half-baked plots – on my hard drive.

And yes, I even published some of it, and instantly regretted it. The reviews were ugly, when anyone even bought one of those books.

It’s been embarrassing. Frustrating. The kind of thing that wakes me up at 3 AM, and I stare at the ceiling, convinced that my successful books were just flukes.

(Hey, at 3 in the morning, anything can seem like high drama, and I can awfulize with the best of them.)

So, yeah. I’m not sure I’m the queen Fix failed fictionof failed fiction, but I’d certainly rate highly on the runners-up list.

Then, last month, when Bonnie (Lynn) Johnston offered me an opportunity to beta test her new Manuscript Magic course, I dropped everything and rushed to try it.

I’ve always liked her advice, and own lots & lots of her reports & courses.

So… let me tell you about Manuscript Magic.

It’s not often I can give a course (or a book, or anything, really) an unqualified rave review, but that course deserves it.

Yes, it’s $197. If you have fiction ideas, plots, half-baked books, or published books that failed… the course is worth at least twice that.

(Seriously, I expected her to charge at least $350 – $400 for this course. It’s that comprehensive, original, and brilliant. No matter what is wrong with your story, she has at least two or three different ways to fix each area where it falters.)

It’s like a university course. The kind that would take at least a semester, and possibly a full year.

But, you get to work through it at your own pace. Lots of videos. Lots of PDFs. Lots of useful information.

So, if you’re at the point where you have books (or book ideas) and you’re not sure why you’re not finishing the book (or why it got snarky reviews), get this course.

In my opinion, it’s worth eating ramen or pb&j sandwiches for a month, if that’s the only way you can afford it.

I’m not kidding.

Take a look at the course.

And, if you want to see a free sample of one lesson, watch this. It’s a 9-minute explanation of what exposition is, and how to use it (and not use it).

In addition to that, I’ve stumbled onto a few other things that are kind of amazing… for me, anyway.

Horwitz kick-started my editing binge

I mentioned this before: Stuart Horwitz’s Finish Your Book in Three Drafts. (Go read my articlescroll down to “Editing Discoveries” – before buying that or his other book, Blueprint Your Best-Seller.)

His book still seems to be amazingly weird, but his advice was what I needed to hear.

I made some great progress, fixing things that were broken in my books. But then, I stalled. (This was before I took Bonnie’s course.)

Meshing character arcs and story arcs

One thing that continually slows my plotting is trying to mesh character arcs and story arcs. Even before taking Bonnie’s course (the one I talked about, above), I knew that something wasn’t clicking in my brain, in that area of plotting.

Then, Chris Fox posted a related video. It was a huge ah-HA! moment for me. Here it is:

(All of his YouTube videos are very good. I don’t always agree with him, but since his book income – and productivity – are light years ahead of mine, pay close attention to everything he says.)

Anyway, after watching that video, I scrambled to find (and print) Dan Harmon’s advice. You’ll find it here: Story Structure 101.

(That’s the first in a series of how-to articles in a multi-part series. And yes, his language can be NSFW. Combined with how Chris Fox explained this… well, I finally have a clear understanding of how stories can work.)

I strongly recommend it.

With this information, I can see a clear path to relaunching older, failed books, and getting stalled books back on track.

Relaunching = Revisiting categories & keywords

In other news… Dave Chesson’s KDP Rocket software has been updated with some very sweet bells & whistles.

See, I’m working my way through Chris Fox’s Write to Market (again), after getting into his Relaunch Your Novel book. I realized I needed to review his Write to Market research tips, to be sure I was current about book categories and keywords.

So, I turned on my copy of KDP Rocket and – initially – thought my favorite book genre as an absolute no-go. The competition numbers (confirmed with KDSpy) were insane.

That’s when Dave’s updates to KDP Rocket made a world of difference. I found three sub-sub-genres that would work for my books. I can compete for those keywords, and in those sub-categories.

And, since I’m rewriting those books anyway, tweaking them to become exact matches for those sub-sub-genres… well, I can’t quite say “easy-peasy.” However, between Bonnie’s course and Dan Harmon’s plot circles, this actually looks like fun.

(If you know how much I hate rewriting anything, you’ll understand: that’s major.)

So, those are my best, most current tips for fixing failed fiction. I hope they’re helpful.

If you have any questions or suggestions, I hope you’ll leave a comment. I’m always interested in your thoughts on these topics.

Newspaper Resources for Nonfiction Research

Using Newspapers for Book ResearchIf you’re writing books related to current news headlines or pop trends, newspapers can be a great resource.

The problem is: Finding the right articles in the right papers.

Basically, if you’re using current-ish newspaper articles for your research, NewsLibrary.com is pretty powerful. But, their annual membership is around $200.

Yikes.

That’s a lot, unless you’re often knee-deep in newspaper research. If that’s your career – and how you spend far too much time, most weeks – the $200 could be worth it. (Or, you can watch for special deals and coupons. During a past special, in February 2018, you could get a year for $30.)

For me… I’m not sure it’s worth it. I’m still thinking about this.

For one thing, I’m writing less nonfiction now.

And, though much of my work focuses on historical fiction, including real people in my stories has always seemed too “cutesy” for me.

HOW I USE NEWSPAPERS FOR FICTION RESEARCH

If something significant happened the (historical) year my story takes place in, I’ll certainly want to know about – and possibly include – cool historical trivia that might affect my story’s world. For that, I start with The People’s Chronology.

If you write anything historical, that book is invaluable. At the moment, you can snag a used copy for under $2.

If you’re thinking about buying that book, get a copy now. In the past, when I’ve recommended hard-to-find books, the prices soared after I talked about them, here. Sometimes, those prices never came down again.

How I use that book: I start with the year or era I’m interested in. Then, I find something topical in The People’s Chronology. After that, I research it in old newspapers for supporting information.

In addition to NewsLibrary.com, here are two more (of many):

Also, GenealogyBank.com is great for researching people. As the site name suggests, it’s for people researching their ancestry.

But – for your books and stories – if you don’t have a person’s name (or the person was in the news, often), I’m not sure it’s practical to manually search their resources. It can be feast or famine, and sometimes – when it’s in the “feast” category – the vast number of newspaper articles can be overwhelming.

Meanwhile, if you’re working with recent, old, vintage, or antique newspapers, and you’re not sure about copyright, keep international laws and public domain guidelines in mind. (The Legal Genealogist had something to say about this, too.)

I’m dashing back to my books now, but wanted to share these resources because I rely on them to enrich so many of my books – fiction and nonfiction.

If you have questions, leave a comment. I’m always happy when I can help others succeed as writers, authors, and indie publishers.

Research Tools and the Expanding Nature of Nonfiction Research

waking up and writing, earlyOn my side of the keyboard, this is a busy research-and-write week. So, even though I haven’t had breakfast yet, I’m flying through another quick post.

(Btw, feedback about Facebook – and the number of people who prefer to hear from me via blog posts – has been surprising. Well, maybe. I kinda-sorta knew that a lot of friends were phasing out Facebook. The feedback confirmed it, big time.)

KDP Rocket or KDSpy?

First up: People are asking me whether they should buy KDSpy or KDP Rocket first.

It’s a coin flip, and if you haven’t written and published at least one to three books, I’d say: buy neither. You can manually research nearly everything those tools do.

(Yes, it will take you time. Yes, it will be tedious. It’s also what most of us did before this software was available. And, unless you can throw money around with wild abandon, you’ll do better to invest in editing, proofreading, or a good book cover. Once you have actual book income, you can dedicate some of it to time-saving tools.)

But anyway… I rely on both KDSpy and KDP Rocket. Both save me so many hours of market research, I can’t imagine being so productive without them.

But, I also understand a limited budget, even after your books start selling.

A lot of writing (and self-employment, in general) can have a feast-or-famine swing, at times. That’s especially true if some of your income is from seasonal books, or you’re paid by traditional publishers just twice a year. (That’s typical in trad publishing.)

So, my answer to the question is: It depends on what you spend the most time on.

If I’m looking for a new or better category for my existing (or planned) books, and I want a better understanding of the easiest markets, KDP Rocket wins, hands down. The new features in the software (updates are always included free, for all of Dave Chesson’s customers) are breathtakingly good.

See… I’d been holding onto old blog posts, planning to use them for some short, topic-specific books in one niche. But, that niche looked crazy-daunting saturated. There was no way I’d waste my time on related books.

Then the new features in KDP Rocket showed me an Amazon category where books (on the same topic as my old blog posts) are selling well, even in short reads, and I can compete, easily.

So, yeah… pretty cool. KDP Rocket just sprinted to the front of the pack, as my go-to tool for Amazon category research, as well as competition research.

But, in categories where I already have books – or, especially in fiction, where my category choices can be limited (sometimes) – KD Spy shows me the current market, the page count, the pricing, the keywords, and more, all in one go. It’s a great, fast trends-checker.

So, if you can only afford one tool at the moment, understand the differences between them. Especially when you’re a new indie author, only invest in what you really need.

Keyword Research

Speaking of keywords, here are a few free tools (and tricks) I absolutely love.

For keywords, I rely on Scientific Seller. Sign up for the free account for the best results.

I’m also dazzled by Answer the Public. It’s insanely good and it replaces several research tools/software I’d been using. Export the CSV file for future reference, and print the individual pages if you’re a visual learner.

And then there’s the manual approach, which – sometimes – can’t be avoided. Or shouldn’t be. (KDSpy will tell you the major keywords, automatically.)

Basically, you’ll identify the best-selling books that target your exact sub-genre or niche, and are selling to your exact target audience.

You’ll cut-and-paste their Amazon book blurbs into a word (or phrase) frequency counter. Here’s a free one: Word Frequency Counter.

Then, if you’re like me,  you’ll look for what I call “duh!” words and phrases. They’re usually obvious ones I’d omitted.

You’ll also look for outliers – odd phrases that may or may not make sense to you – and consider why they’re being used. (It may just be bad copywriting.)

Compare the results with book titles & subtitles that are selling well. Decide if you should incorporate those words & phrases into your book titles, subtitles, descriptions, or advertising.

Easy-peasy, but time consuming. And it could be one of those make-or-break points in your indie publishing career.

Crazy, Expanding Nonfiction Research

This week (and probably next), I’m blasting through a couple of trending, pop culture books.

They’re the fast, trend-grabbing books I explain in my book, How to Write Fast Books…, which is now available through Kindle Unlimited. Ahem.

The book I’m researching now (or should be, but I’m writing this instead) has a lot of related, “everyone knows” material. But, as a fanatical, thorough researcher, I started double-checking a bunch of those “everyone knows” facts.

I figured most of it would be confirmed with one or two clicks, right…?

Wrong. (I’m sitting here, doing flashing-light hands and making the “bwwaaahhh” buzzer sound with my voice. Because, even at my keyboard, I feel like I’m still talking to you, the same as I would in real life.)

That’s why the two hours’ research I’d planned for those facts, have now expanded into two frustrating days.

Because those “facts” were fiction. And I have to rule out every possible, obscure resource, before I debunk those “everyone knows” items in my book/s.

So, I learned to allow about 10x as much research time for topics where fact-checking might be a rabbit hole.

But… the cool part of this story is: my readers will have new information they can be utterly snotty about, as they talk with friends and preen as authorities.

Because my books help people do that. And that’s one of the big reasons many of my fans buy (or at least read) every book I publish.

So anyway…

I just flew through a bunch of points that I think are important. And, since I haven’t had breakfast yet, and this is a rush-rush article, I hope you’ll overlook the typos. Or, if I’ve said anything utterly appalling, post a comment (or reply, if you’re reading this in email) to tell me about it.

And, oh yes, I hope you have great fun (and success) with your writing & publishing. Being an indie can be the best career choice!

Paul vs. The Publishing Gurus – Review

This is another quick review, in lieu of a Facebook post about it… since Facebook is being difficult when I review anything and add a link.

Also, I’m rushing through this, because this report is brand new, and the information could make a big difference in how you market your next book.

I’m recommending Paul Coleman’s latest report, Paul vs. The Publishing Gurus. It covers the most important tips and trends for book marketing. If you want a more successful 2018, I recommend getting a copy of it.

The report price is currently $19.97, and it’s 20 pages long. It covers a wide range of book marketing topics, from the importance of the first two pages of your book, to storytelling as marketing, to the freshest (and most compelling) book cover designs to… well, lots more.

For me, this report is valuable because it sums up some powerful marketing information in a no-fluff, no-nonsense style.

Also, I think a lot of the value is in the links (generally to free resources, though I’ve only visited a few so far) which expand the concepts Paul shares in the report.

Just one of them provided an “ah-HA!” realization that – for me – made this report worth owning, reading, and putting to use.

If you haven’t actually written a book, or you’re too busy to pursue writing & publishing right now, you don’t need this report yet.

Like nearly everything I recommend, the only way this report is valuable is if you actually use it.

This is delivered as a PDF, and there is no upsell. Everything is in the report.

Link: Paul vs. The Publishing Gurus

(As usual, that’s not an affiliate link. I review products to help others find good resources, period & full stop. I don’t earn a cent if someone buys what I recommend.)