‘Tis the Season… for Short Reads

old fashioned clockIt’s that time of year!

No, not just back-to-school. I’m talking about the upcoming holidays.

In the past week (third week of August 2017), I’ve seen a surprising increase in the sale of my Christmas-themed books.

In other words: holiday-related books can start selling now. It’s not too early (or too late) to write some good, useful books that focus on Halloween, Thanksgiving, Christmas, New Years, and New Year’s resolutions (diet and fitness).

Keep your readers in mind. They’re as rushed as you are during the hectic holiday season. So, they’re attracted to short how-to guides to holiday projects and celebrations.

As the saying goes, the best books for these readers are “one problem, one answer” books.

Some topics that come to mind are:

  • Where and when to see autumn foliage (and how to preserve the pretty leaves for Thanksgiving wreaths). A short book could talk about local sights, travel tips, regional hikes, or how to dress for the weather. (Those are just a few ideas.) Here’s one resource: http://www.goodhousekeeping.com/life/news/a45738/fall-foliage-map-2017/
  • How to carve a pumpkin and light it from within. Maybe include recipes, how to dry & grow pumpkin seeds for next year, etc. (Get inspiration at Google Images for “how to carve a pumpkin design. Pick a theme and run with it!)
  • Make quick Halloween costumes with household items. (Again, pick a theme or a kind of supply, like old bedsheets — ghosts, togas, etc. — or thrift-shop item makeovers. <– Tip: Old prom gowns can make the best “princess dresses.”)
  • How to make pretty, fire-safe, luminary candle bags/displays. (In addition, maybe offer free downloads of patterns to cut themed designs?)
  • How to deep-fry a turkey… without an explosion. (Deep-frying can actually be healthier than the traditional roasted turkey.)
  • Thanksgiving on the barbecue. (The Weber blog has some interesting side dish ideas. Not sure which wine or dessert would go best with each, but these recipes are great starting points.)
  • Thanksgiving entrees for vegetarian and vegan guests. Or people on specialized diets, like the ketogenic diet, and any other new-and-trendy diets, this year.
  • Holiday lights (and holiday displays) on a budget. Or ideas for a particular holiday decorating theme, like Game of Thrones, Superheroes, etc. (Expand it into recipes, gift ideas (bought or homemade), and a themed Santa to deliver them to the party… your book and presentation could go viral with very little effort.)
  • Hanukkah traditions made simple (or embellished with rich history). (Many related sites are already updated for 2017.)
  • Decorate an educational, multi-cultural Christmas tree.
  • A list of all the holidays (even ancient ones) around December, and ways to celebrate them with your children. (Educational sites can be a gold mine. Here’s one: http://www.educationworld.com/a_lesson/lesson/lesson246.shtml )
  • How to cope with the holidays when you celebrate something different… or none at all. (The answer is not “just stay at home.” The Richard Dawkins Foundation offers an atheist’s personal insights.)
  • How to have an all-day New Year’s celebration. (Start with a schedule of the days/times when 2018 begins, worldwide. Select a few and suggest activities & foods for your family & guests, changing the themes as the day/evening progresses.)

Of course, seasonal fiction — especially short reads — are a great idea.

(Earlier this year, I used Britt Malka’s Sandkorn plotting method to come up with over 30 seasonal book ideas in a single sitting. Right now, I’m using her Partridge Method for some short Christmas books.)

Keep nonfiction in mind as well. Establish yourself as an authority in one holiday niche — or expand your existing expertise to include holiday-related topics — and you might save someone’s Halloween. Or Thanksgiving. Or other holiday with an “oops” moment.

(I’m reminded of the movie, A Christmas Story, where the neighbor’s dogs almost ruined Ralphie’s family’s Christmas dinner.)

It’s not too early or too late to publish some holiday-related books. Think about trends and your personal interests, and you may uncover some great, seasonal “one problem, one answer” topics for successful Kindle books.

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