For Wildly Successful Marketing: Evoke Emotions

buy nowRecently, I’ve attended several webinars about book marketing. Most of them were snooze-worthy, repeating things I’d heard before.

I’m not always sure where this kind of information originates, but when I do know, I tell you about it.

Meanwhile, by the time it’s diluted four or five times — in the Internet Marketing version of “post office” — it’s lost a lot of its impact… as well as some key points for success.

For those with deep pockets, I know that Nick Stephenson’s book marketing training is superb.

Much of what I hear & see, online, is a watered-down version of what he recommends. And, sadly, those watered-down versions often omit key points Nick (and no one else) shared, but authors really need to know.

Don’t despair. If your favorite price tag says “free” on it, you’re in luck. Nick also provides free training, Your First 10k Readers. (I’ve raved about it, before, and still do.)

Follow his advice before investing in any “budget priced” book marketing courses. Nick’s course may be all you need to catapult your book sales into a far higher range.

One topic repeated in several webinars is the use of emotions — words and images — in book marketing.

Here are some of my notes.

Use power words in book descriptions, landing pages, etc.

For the best words to use, I’ve heard phrases like “emotionally charged” and “semantically charged” words.

The latter phrase tends to show up most often in NLP discussions. Here’s one: http://www.nlpisfun.com/2012/09/nlp-semantically-charged-words.html 

  • If you’re an absolute geek, you may appreciate details of the McKenna & Sharma study, but it’s not for most people. And it’s not about marketing, per se. http://file.scirp.org/pdf/PSYCH20120700004_72377156.pdf )
  • Also, this isn’t the same thing as “selling the feeling.” From my viewpoint, that’s a very different kind of marketing, better suited to selling cars and other high-ticket items.

Indie authors may glean useful tips from articles like How to Evoke Emotions in Your Landing Pages (from Hubspot), and the original words list they mention, List of Feeling Words.

Using the latter list, plus a handy thesaurus (like Thesaurus.com), can bring extra impact to your book sales.

My thoughts…? If emotionally charged words are good enough for Jamie Oliver’s marketing, they’re good enough for me.

Make your book descriptions richer with words that match the tone of your book… amplified, slightly.

However, a too-gushy sales page will send readers running in the other direction.

My simplest advice: Add two or three obviously powerful words in your first sentence (or in the first 20-or-so words, if you’re not writing lengthy sentences). But that’s a generalization; your results may vary.

If you’re still blinking and wondering just how to use words like those — when, where, and how many — I recommend Bill Platt’s Hypnotic Book Descriptions.

In that report (selling for around $21, at the time I wrote this), Bill goes into excruciating detail about what works and why.

Much of his 51-page report is loaded (maybe overloaded) with the kinds of stories and phrases to use in your book descriptions, sales letters, and emails to readers.

And, he includes a 33-page bonus of already researched and categorized word lists related to specific emotions you might want to generate in your potential book buyer. For me, that was a real time-saver.

The main report…? I’m condensing his important points — and his (very useful) book description templates — to about two pages, to keep as a reference in my marketing notebook.

However, that’s my reaction. I’ve been involved in marketing since forever, so a lot of what Bill said wasn’t news for me. I just needed his report’s nudge to get me to use what I know. That nudge was worth the money.

At the moment, adding emotionally charged words to your marketing seems to be a very hot topic. The free resources I’ve linked to should get you started.

If you need more insights, Bill’s information is very good.

Other than that…? So far, after watching far too many book marketing webinars, I can’t recommend anything new in the $17 – $297 price range. (And, to me, it looks like a lot of people who used to sell $37 reports and courses have marked them — and new, similar training products — up to $197 and higher, without adding more value.)

Best freebies I’ve found, recently: Nick’s “First 10k Readers” training, and the articles at Dave Chesson’s Kindlepreneur site.

And now, I’m getting back to my books.

If you’ve found some good marketing freebies, or have insights about emotionally charged words, I hope you’ll share them in comments, below.

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