Fast Books, Fiction, and Frustration

The past couple of months have included a steep learning curve.

Oh, it’s been a great experience… but challenging. Sometimes, even frustrating.

When I write “fast books” (mostly nonfiction), I seize a fun idea. Then, I spend a few days collecting all kinds of information and trivia. After that, I throw the book together and hit the Publish button.

Within a month (or so), that book usually earns four figures, and continues to sell well for weeks. A few of those books have continued selling for years, long after the topic left the headlines. (Earning five figures from a book that took me about two weeks to research & write…? Yes, I’m okay with that.)

Pandora, Disney's Animal Kingdom, photo by Eibhlin MacIntosh
Entering the “Avatar” world of Pandora, at Disney’s Animal Kingdom – from our May 2017 visit

But, I’ve wanted to get back to writing fiction. Over a decade ago, working with traditional publishers, fiction was fun.

I liked “living in” a world I’ve created in my mind. I enjoyed crafting plots that were whimsical and intriguing.

But then, indie publishing became easier and faster. It certainly pays much better, as well.

I tried it and liked it.

Soon, I switched to nonfiction after a couple of my “fast” books sold like hotcakes.

But, a few years later… I miss fiction. And, long-term, fiction is probably a better income path for me.

So, I’ve been re-learning how to write fiction. This involves catching up on a wealth of fiction-writing resources. (When I wrote fiction, years ago, even the “Hero’s Journey” concept was new.)

Now my biggest struggle is getting used to the pace of writing fiction. That process is almost 180-degrees different from how I build & write my “fast”nonfiction books.

After lots of trial-and-error testing, I’m finally finding my creative path to good fiction.

I start with an idea for a story. (I have no shortage of ideas.)

Then, I go straight to research. I look for credible locations, names for my characters, and authentic lifestyle elements that fit the sub-genre.

After that, I think for a few days. Maybe weeks.

That “thinking” part seems to involve letting my creative mind run in the background, while I’m reading books, going for walks, visiting Disney World (see my photo, above), cooking in the kitchen, or watching TV.

Usually, I seem to do best with mindless TV that has little or nothing to do with the fiction I’m planning. This week, it’s included the new Dirk Gently series (BBC America & Hulu), and the new Midnight, TX series (just started on NBC & Hulu).

Those choices are odd.  I’m radically revising a book that’s YA romantic suspense, and plotting a light, sweet Regency romance.

But… both the Gently series and the Midnight series are weird and dark. There are no dots to connect, between what I’m watching and what I’m writing.

So, yes, I’ll admit it: All this “what does this have to do with writing?” stuff… it’s been frustrating. I feel like I’m not working. Not making progress. Being a slacker.

I get to the end of the day (or week) and feel like I’m spinning my wheels. I should be doing things… right?

But then, like yesterday morning, I wake up with half the plot (and all of the worldbuilding) in my head. I grab a pen and scribble it onto the yellow, lined pad of paper I keep next to the bed.

Four pages of notes. Lots of arrows connecting one concept to another, indicating things that will repeat and give the story rhythm & resonance.

Wow. It’s perfect. Even I am impressed by the originality and depth. This is a story I’d read and enjoy.

And then, last night, after another day of cooking, reading, going for walks, and watching more oh-dear-heaven TV shows… I grabbed my pen & paper, again.

Suddenly, spilling out of my mind, I had the rest of the plot, plus some character nuances, and a few worldbuilding embellishments.

Already, I love this book! I keep looking at my notes and thinking, “Wow, did I actually come up with those ideas, myself?” * blink, blink *

Well, yes, I did.

But here’s the weird part: I’m not sure I could have “worked” my way to this plot, world, and characters.

This level of freshness and whimsy (plus an engaging, original plot) seems to happen when I’m deliberately not working.

This process is more relaxed and intuitive than I’d expected.

So, that’s been my latest discovery. I’m sharing it in case it’s helpful to you, too.

Today, I’m refining the current plot via 3×5 cards. (I’m loosely following Stuart Horwitz’s slightly weird & eccentric book, Finish Your Book in Three Drafts… While You Still Love It.)

And then, I’m giving myself permission to enjoy being a slacker, and spend the weekend at Disney World.

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