Font Choices – Prettier Printed Books

Free font choices for prettier printed books.When I publish a topical book that needs to be selling in Amazon immediately (if not sooner), the formatting is usually plain vanilla.

For CreateSpace books, my go-to font is 11- or 12-point Georgia. I center the headings (or use the default in OpenOffice), and I make sure the margins seem wide enough.

(That can be a tricky balance. I don’t want it took look as if I used big type and wide margins to the book looks longer than it is. But, with too-narrow interior, readers might have to pry open the book to see all the words.)

For my latest book, I did something different. I actually spent an hour at Google Fonts, selecting a font I liked. I chose “Unna.”

But, I also snagged several other fonts from this guy’s list, for future use. Some are better than others. The main ones I looked at: Prata, Oranienbaum, Rozha One, Rufina, Suranna, and Unna.

Most of these are different from the free commercial fonts I download at FontSquirrel.com.

Your impressions may vary, so I recommend checking his full list:

https://www.quora.com/What-are-some-typefaces-that-are-similar-to-Didot

And then… I discovered I actually liked tweaking the printed book so the appearance was pleasing. (This one is likely to sell in tourist gift shops, so I wanted to be sure the book had the publishing equivalent of “curb appeal.”)

I may go back and reformat several of my printed books.

(Tip: “Fringe” readers – aka those who like woo-woo topics – and academics tend to buy printed books. So do some readers of Regencies and other historical romances. And the occasional cozy mystery reader, who wants to flip back through the pages, seeing the clues/foreshadowing that had been hiding in plain sight.)