Advice for a First-Time Indie Author

Curious George toy

The following is edited from PMs I’d exchanged with a first-time fiction writer. Much of this probably isn’t new for anyone regularly reading my blog, but it may provide others with some fresh insights.

Here’s the backstory: Earlier this week, I’d read a friend’s wife’s historical novel. She’d published it in Kindle herself. I was impressed by her writing skills.

As we swapped messages, she asked if I write outlines for my books.

I replied:

Yes, I do outline. I work with a few things, starting with a page of notes (on yellow, lined paper), then I use the “middle school” outline: https://katherinekingauthor.wordpress.com/2015/07/10/but-and-so-your-way-to-plot-summary-the-middle-school-approach-to-plot/

After that, I fill in Larry Brooks’ old tent-style story structure form, to figure the story beats: http://www.realmofsavage.com/download/writing/8-5x11_TentBeatSheet.pdf (Explained here: http://storyfix.com/two-more-killer-visual-story-development-tools )

And then, I write my outline. If it’s a romance, I use Katherine King’s “Love Plot” but a lot of friends like Gwen Hayes’ “Romancing the Beat.” There are other options, as well.

Then, seeing her Amazon rank (and what it meant, in sales), I suggested a few marketing tips that might improve her visibility and sales.

Here’s what I recommended:

1. Use the Hemingway Editor on the first five or so pages, to make the “look inside” easier (meaning: simpler phrasing) to read.

After readers have read more of your book, and they’re used to your writing “voice,” readability and sentence lengths are less important.

However, for marketing, your text needs to be super-simple for readers to get into. Even on the Amazon sales page, you want readers to be caught up in the story from the very start.

I have the Hemingway Editor on my desktop, but you can use it, free, at the website. http://www.hemingwayapp.com/ <— Just highlight their sample text, remove it, and paste in part of your opening. (The software was originally called the “Hemingway App,” and a lot of long-time writers — including me — still call it that.)

2. [She had published using her real name.] Add a co-author name — one you make up — that will be your future pen name, and republish your book.

So, at Amazon (etc.), the authors (two names on the cover) will be your real name, with a second, co-author name you choose, as well.

(I like to find interesting names in my family tree, from the era I’m writing in, and select one as my pen name. Sometimes, book sales will improve with a pen name that’s related to the genre or time period you’re writing about.)

That way, people who know you (in real life) can find this book, but your fans will start following your pen name… and you keep most of your privacy.

I cannot over-emphasize the importance of setting up boundaries, early, to protect your privacy and your family’s. Trust me on this. Please. Fans can be a little overzealous. Sometimes in scary ways.

3. Add a subtitle, saying what the book is about. Tell people the time period, and what the genre is. For example, I’m working on Regency romances right now, so my titles (with subtitles) will be something like “The Dangerous Duke – A Regency Romance.”

4. If you can, hire someone to design a professional-looking book cover. The right book cover will pay for itself, quickly.

I recommend going to Fiverr.com and hiring vikncharlie. (That’s her username.) https://www.fiverr.com/vikncharlie/design-you-an-awesome-book-cover

You can hire her at the lowest price and get something pretty good, but I give her about $35 and she creates something amazing for me. In addition, I can use the cover on my Kindle (etc.) books, as well as my printed (CreateSpace) books.

And, any graphics she uses… you can be certain they’re legal to use. (I can’t say that about all Fiverr cover designers.)

Those are the basics, as far as I’m concerned. You can follow-up with more professional marketing, including help from Fiverr book marketer, bknights, and some well-targeted Facebook ads.

A good book deserves the best marketing you can give it. Of course, your marketing efforts shouldn’t compromise your time (or budget) for actually producing books.

Nevertheless, if you’re publishing books at all, they should be good books and have enough marketing to be discovered by hungry readers in your sub-genre.

photo courtesy freeimages.com and J Aaron Farr

2 thoughts on “Advice for a First-Time Indie Author”

    1. No problem, Dave! Your free tools are stellar and I consistently recommend them as the best I’ve seen. Plus that, I like your sense of humor.

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